The Collections Project: Heidi Kenyon

Heidi Kenyon’s contemporary sculpture and installation practice is motivated by the curious complexities and stories embedded within found objects and common materials: both natural and human-made. In the studio, she employs methods of drawing out, dissecting and accentuating the inherent structures of the materials she works with to elicit narrative.

Heidi has long been intrigued by the Garden of Health at the Botanic Gardens of South Australia as a resource for contemplation and healing, and was fascinated to learn recently that the origin of botanical gardens dating back as far as the 16th century was to showcase plant-based medicine as a teaching tool for physicians. She believes that objects and natural materials have the potential to exist as carriers of our lieu de memoire (realm of memory), and contain clues to be unravelled. Her research will focus on the memories and knowledge held within hundreds of thousands of years of plant medicine, extending her current interest into the nature of memory and the memories of nature.

The outcome of Heidi’s project will be exhibited at the Santos Museum of Economic Botany in June and July 2018.

 

The Collections Project: Botanic Gardens of South Australia

The Collections Project 2018 at the Botanic Gardens of South Australia (BGSA) is a collaborative project between Guildhouse and the Botanic Gardens that provides artists with the opportunity to respond to the extensive collection of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens and develop new work for exhibition at the Santos Museum of Economic Botany. Home to an amazing permanent collection, much of which dates back to the original museum display 130 years ago, the Santos Museum of Economic Botany is the last Museum of its kind in the world. Artists working with BGSA will not only have access to this collection but also the Garden’s living collection, library and State Herbarium.

 

Image: Heidi Kenyon, Cold Hands Warm Heart (detail), 2013. Resin, thread and twigs. Dimensions variable. Photograph Grant Hancock.

 

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